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Derya Unutmaz has been at 1 events

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Dawn Mission Engagement and Communications (E/C)1,936Update: Video here! http://www.youtube.com/user/NoisyAstronomer?v=SqIszii4H0c and here: https://plus.google.com/b/114633249213698877766/114633249213698877766/posts/Qq2jowbYN5h After an awesome year exploring asteroid Vesta, NASA’s Dawn Mission cruises on to Ceres 2015! Celebrate at a Dawn Mission Team Hangout!. Moderated by Dawn’s education and public outreach (E/PO) liaison, Dr. Britney Schmidt, and CosmoQuest, we'll talk about the results, the spacecraft, and our hopes for Ceres in 2015. You'll have a chance to ask questions and get involved. Stars of the show so far?  • Dr. Tom Prettyman, Science Team and GRaND lead, Planetary Science Institute • Drs. Tim Weise and Charles Gardner, NASA JPL Flight Operations Team • Drs. Lucille Le Corre and Vishnu Reddy, Framing Camera Team, Max Plank       Institute for Solar System Research • Dr. Debra Buczkowski, Participating Scientist, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory Submit your questions for the Dawn team by leaving them in the comments section below, on Dawn’s Facebook page, or by using the hashtag #HastaLaVesta on Twitter. Visit this event page on September 8, 2012 to watch the _Hangout On Air_, and to chime in on the conversation. Official website: http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/news/hasta_la_vesta.asp Twitter: https://twitter.com/nasa_dawn Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dawn.mission As the schedule and guest list is secured, we'll continue updating this page. Stay tuned for additional details.Dawn Mission Google+ Hangout with CosmoQuest2012-09-08 21:00:00110  

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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 9

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2015-07-12 19:11:58 (9 comments; 6 reshares; 26 +1s)Open 

Experiences of a woman who participated in a psychedelic drug (LSD) research recorded in 1960s.

Most reshares: 40

posted image

2015-07-11 15:52:20 (3 comments; 40 reshares; 77 +1s)Open 

Ocean life looks unreal in this time-lapsed and hyper-focused video

It's rare that you get a close-up peek at the hidden wonders of the world. Especially when it's a glance at the multi-colored, pulsating creatures that live deep in the ocean's trenches.
Sandro Bocci, an Italian film and documentary maker who specializes in experimenting with filming nature, shot a hypnotic underwater time-lapse of some strange-looking, alien-like aquatic animals in a marine aquarium in San Benedetto del Tronto, Italy.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/beautiful-time-lapse-video-of-creatures-of-the-ocean-2015-7#ixzz3fbB7F7BZ

Most plusones: 374

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2015-06-25 00:30:42 (6 comments; 1 reshares; 374 +1s)Open 

#truedetective  

Senaste inlägg

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2016-02-03 16:40:18 (2 comments; 3 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 

Researchers have created male mice with no trace of a Y chromosome, supposedly the defining hallmark of being male.

Reproductive biologist Monika Ward of the University of Hawaii in Honolulu and colleagues started with mice that have only one X chromosome (and no second sex chromosome). Normally those animals would develop as females. But when the researchers manipulated genes found on the X and another chromosome, the mice became males that could produce immature sperm. Those engineered males fathered offspring with reproductive assistance from the researchers, who injected the immature sperm into eggs, Ward and colleagues report in the Jan. 29 Science.

Researchers have created male mice with no trace of a Y chromosome, supposedly the defining hallmark of being male.

Reproductive biologist Monika Ward of the University of Hawaii in Honolulu and colleagues started with mice that have only one X chromosome (and no second sex chromosome). Normally those animals would develop as females. But when the researchers manipulated genes found on the X and another chromosome, the mice became males that could produce immature sperm. Those engineered males fathered offspring with reproductive assistance from the researchers, who injected the immature sperm into eggs, Ward and colleagues report in the Jan. 29 Science.___

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2016-01-13 17:23:56 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

The Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI): Launched by President Obama early in 2015, the PMI will continue to be an attention grabber. A huge amount of work has been done to develop the proposed initiative programs in the relatively short interval since, but much more progress is needed once the funding is in hand.



The Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI): Launched by President Obama early in 2015, the PMI will continue to be an attention grabber. A huge amount of work has been done to develop the proposed initiative programs in the relatively short interval since, but much more progress is needed once the funding is in hand.

___

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2016-01-11 00:56:04 (0 comments; 6 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

Stunning 3D biological animation!

Stunning 3D biological animation!___

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2016-01-10 15:17:45 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 19 +1s)Open 

British scientists believe they have made a huge step forward in the understanding of the mechanisms of human intelligence. That genetic inheritance must play some part has never been disputed. Despite occasional claims later dismissed, no-one has yet produced a single gene that controls intelligence.

But Michael Johnson of Imperial College London, a consultant neurologist and colleagues report in Nature Neuroscience that they may have discovered a very different answer: two networks of genes, perhaps controlled by some master regulatory system, lie behind the human gift for lateral thinking, mental arithmetic, pub quizzes, strategic planning, cryptic crosswords and the ability to laugh at limericks.

British scientists believe they have made a huge step forward in the understanding of the mechanisms of human intelligence. That genetic inheritance must play some part has never been disputed. Despite occasional claims later dismissed, no-one has yet produced a single gene that controls intelligence.

But Michael Johnson of Imperial College London, a consultant neurologist and colleagues report in Nature Neuroscience that they may have discovered a very different answer: two networks of genes, perhaps controlled by some master regulatory system, lie behind the human gift for lateral thinking, mental arithmetic, pub quizzes, strategic planning, cryptic crosswords and the ability to laugh at limericks.___

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2016-01-03 17:11:46 (6 comments; 18 reshares; 47 +1s)Open 

Amazing Lego Mindstorm robot creation playing the guitar!

Amazing Lego Mindstorm robot creation playing the guitar!___

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2016-01-01 01:15:38 (5 comments; 10 reshares; 45 +1s)Open 

Happy and healthy new year friends! 
Wishing you all "to put a dent in your universe" in 2016! 
Stay hungry, Stay foolish :)

Happy and healthy new year friends! 
Wishing you all "to put a dent in your universe" in 2016! 
Stay hungry, Stay foolish :)___

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2016-01-01 01:00:23 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 

___

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2015-12-31 20:15:44 (3 comments; 8 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 

Ending 2015 with yet another breakthrough medical advance enabled by CRISPR technology. 

"The red-hot genome editing tool known as CRISPR has scored another achievement: Researchers have used it to treat a severe form of muscular dystrophy in mice. Three groups report today in Science that they wielded CRISPR to snip out part of a defective gene in mice with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), allowing the animals to make an essential muscle protein. The approach is the first time CRISPR has been successfully delivered throughout the body to treat grown animals with a genetic disease."

Ending 2015 with yet another breakthrough medical advance enabled by CRISPR technology. 

"The red-hot genome editing tool known as CRISPR has scored another achievement: Researchers have used it to treat a severe form of muscular dystrophy in mice. Three groups report today in Science that they wielded CRISPR to snip out part of a defective gene in mice with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), allowing the animals to make an essential muscle protein. The approach is the first time CRISPR has been successfully delivered throughout the body to treat grown animals with a genetic disease."___

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2015-12-27 15:40:14 (1 comments; 4 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 

The science of hope. 5 terrible illnesses that genetic engineering could eliminate forever.

"It has been only about a decade since we first read the human genome (so ) we should exercise great caution before we begin to rewrite it." But while more discussion and regulation is necessary before these tools become a free-for-all, "genome editing also holds great therapeutic promise."

http://goo.gl/VU1jM6
Study: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1506446 (ungated)
Image credit tc.pbs.org

The science of hope. 5 terrible illnesses that genetic engineering could eliminate forever.

"It has been only about a decade since we first read the human genome (so ) we should exercise great caution before we begin to rewrite it." But while more discussion and regulation is necessary before these tools become a free-for-all, "genome editing also holds great therapeutic promise."

http://goo.gl/VU1jM6
Study: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1506446 (ungated)
Image credit tc.pbs.org___

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2015-12-27 15:38:04 (4 comments; 8 reshares; 27 +1s)Open 

Want to lose abdominal fat, get smarter and live longer? New research led by USC’s Valter Longo shows that periodically adopting a diet that mimics the effects of fasting may yield a wide range of health benefits.

In a new study, Longo and his colleagues show that cycles of a four-day low-calorie diet that mimics fasting (FMD) cut visceral belly fat and elevated the number of progenitor and stem cells in several organs of old mice — including the brain, where it boosted neural regeneration and improved learning and memory.

Want to lose abdominal fat, get smarter and live longer? New research led by USC’s Valter Longo shows that periodically adopting a diet that mimics the effects of fasting may yield a wide range of health benefits.

In a new study, Longo and his colleagues show that cycles of a four-day low-calorie diet that mimics fasting (FMD) cut visceral belly fat and elevated the number of progenitor and stem cells in several organs of old mice — including the brain, where it boosted neural regeneration and improved learning and memory.___

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2015-12-25 17:47:05 (1 comments; 3 reshares; 15 +1s)Open 

Biology’s breakout star this year is definitely CRISPR, a precise genome-editing tool that has inspired talk of “designer babies,” hundreds of millions of dollars poured into CRISPR companies, and an international summit about the ethics of it all.

So it’s pretty hard to top CRISPR, but biology had plenty of other big stories in 2015. In fact, we’ve got (“female Viagra”), death (rhinos), and drugs (yeast heroin). And also poop...

Biology’s breakout star this year is definitely CRISPR, a precise genome-editing tool that has inspired talk of “designer babies,” hundreds of millions of dollars poured into CRISPR companies, and an international summit about the ethics of it all.

So it’s pretty hard to top CRISPR, but biology had plenty of other big stories in 2015. In fact, we’ve got (“female Viagra”), death (rhinos), and drugs (yeast heroin). And also poop...___

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2015-12-24 16:08:57 (3 comments; 4 reshares; 41 +1s)Open 

Spectacular shot!

"The company of three" ... strange relationship between three red-footed falcons.

Credit: Winner of Wildlife photographer of 2015 Amir Ben-Dov

Source: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/visit/wpy/gallery/2015/images/birds/4931/the-company-of-three.html

Spectacular shot!

"The company of three" ... strange relationship between three red-footed falcons.

Credit: Winner of Wildlife photographer of 2015 Amir Ben-Dov

Source: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/visit/wpy/gallery/2015/images/birds/4931/the-company-of-three.html___

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2015-12-12 19:17:29 (2 comments; 4 reshares; 21 +1s)Open 

Cool!

Van Dough.

Engineered colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast grew to create this farmhouse scene.

http://goo.gl/QGhYcM___Cool!

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2015-12-05 20:40:37 (1 comments; 3 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

A short film celebrating the centennial of Einstein's theory of General Relativity.

A short film celebrating the centennial of Einstein's theory of General Relativity.___

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2015-11-21 22:20:09 (3 comments; 5 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 

Amazing Lattice light-sheet microscopy animations!

Amazing Lattice light-sheet microscopy animations!___

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2015-11-18 02:01:40 (0 comments; 6 reshares; 25 +1s)Open 

Gut Vascular Barrier (GVB): new anatomical structure discovered by Italian scientists.

Researchers describe a barrier in mice between the intestine and the adjacent blood vessels that restricts the size of particles that can pass through. Although this barrier appears to prevent most bacteria from entering the bloodstream, certain pathogenic species—including some Salmonella—are capable of establishing infections in the blood, liver and other organs.

The Scientist, http://goo.gl/pMI7az

Study: Spadoni et al., “A gut-vascular barrier controls the systemic dissemination of bacteria,” Science, 350:830-34, 2015.
Salmonella Bacteria, image source https://goo.gl/IFZGfb

Gut Vascular Barrier (GVB): new anatomical structure discovered by Italian scientists.

Researchers describe a barrier in mice between the intestine and the adjacent blood vessels that restricts the size of particles that can pass through. Although this barrier appears to prevent most bacteria from entering the bloodstream, certain pathogenic species—including some Salmonella—are capable of establishing infections in the blood, liver and other organs.

The Scientist, http://goo.gl/pMI7az

Study: Spadoni et al., “A gut-vascular barrier controls the systemic dissemination of bacteria,” Science, 350:830-34, 2015.
Salmonella Bacteria, image source https://goo.gl/IFZGfb___

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2015-10-20 03:01:13 (1 comments; 5 reshares; 34 +1s)Open 

New #starwars trailer is out !!

New #starwars trailer is out !!___

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2015-10-16 19:24:35 (1 comments; 10 reshares; 68 +1s)Open 

2015 Photomicrography Competition Winners.

Live imaging of perfused vasculature in a mouse brain with glioblastoma.

More: http://goo.gl/jFpKBj

2015 Photomicrography Competition Winners.

Live imaging of perfused vasculature in a mouse brain with glioblastoma.

More: http://goo.gl/jFpKBj___

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2015-10-16 19:24:16 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 

Platelet release in the lung observed by mouse intravital imaging.

Platelets are a component of the blood circulation critical for hemostasis and thrombosis and increasingly implicated in immune responses. Platelets are fragments of the largest cell in the body, megakaryocytes. The fragmentation of megakaryocytes, leading to the production of platelets (thrombopoiesis), has been described to occur in the bone marrow. Using two-photon intravital imaging, we imaged megakaryocytes and platelets in the adult mouse lung during homeostasis. The structure of the lung can be observed in red and platelets and megakaryocytes are tagged in green (PF4-cre x mTmG). In this movie, a large green cell (megakaryocyte) is undergoing pro-platelet formation in the lung microcirculation. This intravital movie shows for the first time the critical role of the lung in thrombopoiesis.

Platelet release in the lung observed by mouse intravital imaging.

Platelets are a component of the blood circulation critical for hemostasis and thrombosis and increasingly implicated in immune responses. Platelets are fragments of the largest cell in the body, megakaryocytes. The fragmentation of megakaryocytes, leading to the production of platelets (thrombopoiesis), has been described to occur in the bone marrow. Using two-photon intravital imaging, we imaged megakaryocytes and platelets in the adult mouse lung during homeostasis. The structure of the lung can be observed in red and platelets and megakaryocytes are tagged in green (PF4-cre x mTmG). In this movie, a large green cell (megakaryocyte) is undergoing pro-platelet formation in the lung microcirculation. This intravital movie shows for the first time the critical role of the lung in thrombopoiesis.___

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2015-10-08 20:42:19 (3 comments; 4 reshares; 24 +1s)Open 

Every year, local communities on either side of the Apurimac River Canyon use traditional Inka engineering techniques to rebuild the Q'eswachaka Bridge. The old bridge is taken down and the new bridge is built in only three days. The bridge has been rebuilt in this same location continually since the time of the Inka. 

Every year, local communities on either side of the Apurimac River Canyon use traditional Inka engineering techniques to rebuild the Q'eswachaka Bridge. The old bridge is taken down and the new bridge is built in only three days. The bridge has been rebuilt in this same location continually since the time of the Inka. ___

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2015-10-05 21:13:50 (2 comments; 4 reshares; 25 +1s)Open 

Remembering Steve Jobs, who died 4 years ago on October 5th ... he is dearly missed. 

Remembering Steve Jobs, who died 4 years ago on October 5th ... he is dearly missed. ___

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2015-09-23 20:22:56 (1 comments; 6 reshares; 25 +1s)Open 

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases explains food allergy and offers tips on how to manage the condition.

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases explains food allergy and offers tips on how to manage the condition.___

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2015-09-15 22:46:16 (8 comments; 13 reshares; 70 +1s)Open 

The point of view is not always what it seems ... :)

The point of view is not always what it seems ... :)___

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2015-09-12 17:21:11 (3 comments; 6 reshares; 36 +1s)Open 

An ancient giant virus from Siberia's frozen wasteland

French researchers have announced the discovery of Mollivirus sibericum in the frozen wastelands of Siberia. The virus is believed to be  30,000-year-old giant virus that so far remains dormant in the cold environment. As the global warming accelerates, it could potentially awaken dormant microbes like Mollivirus sibericum.

An ancient giant virus from Siberia's frozen wasteland

French researchers have announced the discovery of Mollivirus sibericum in the frozen wastelands of Siberia. The virus is believed to be  30,000-year-old giant virus that so far remains dormant in the cold environment. As the global warming accelerates, it could potentially awaken dormant microbes like Mollivirus sibericum.___

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2015-08-30 17:40:41 (4 comments; 3 reshares; 35 +1s)Open 

Very sad news that legendary neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks has passed away  :(  

He had recently joined NYU School of medicine where I had the chance to see him there last year. He will be missed and remembered through his remarkable books on the condition of human mind. 

#OliverSacks

Very sad news that legendary neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks has passed away  :(  

He had recently joined NYU School of medicine where I had the chance to see him there last year. He will be missed and remembered through his remarkable books on the condition of human mind. 

#OliverSacks___

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2015-08-06 13:44:24 (2 comments; 6 reshares; 25 +1s)Open 

I am very proud of all my colleagues and working +The Jackson Laboratory  which is expanding its efforts for personalized medicine in many diseases and extending the healthy human lifespan, to make the world better place!

http://www.acceleratingdiscovery.com

"The Jackson Laboratory is leading the search for cures through the science of genetics, genomics and precision medicine. Learn more about how the Laboratory’s scientists are accelerating discovery in order to find more effective, precise and personalized ways to treat, prevent and cure diseases like cancer — and about how philanthropy makes our mission possible.

Gifts from friends are vital to sustaining The Jackson Laboratory's historic mission and keeping us at the forefront of scientific discovery. "

I am very proud of all my colleagues and working +The Jackson Laboratory  which is expanding its efforts for personalized medicine in many diseases and extending the healthy human lifespan, to make the world better place!

http://www.acceleratingdiscovery.com

"The Jackson Laboratory is leading the search for cures through the science of genetics, genomics and precision medicine. Learn more about how the Laboratory’s scientists are accelerating discovery in order to find more effective, precise and personalized ways to treat, prevent and cure diseases like cancer — and about how philanthropy makes our mission possible.

Gifts from friends are vital to sustaining The Jackson Laboratory's historic mission and keeping us at the forefront of scientific discovery. "___

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2015-08-01 15:27:16 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 

Another great educational video from Vsauce

Q: "What's an anagram of Banach-Tarski?" 
A: "Banach-Tarski Banach-Tarski."

Another great educational video from Vsauce

Q: "What's an anagram of Banach-Tarski?" 
A: "Banach-Tarski Banach-Tarski."___

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2015-08-01 15:11:31 (0 comments; 27 reshares; 39 +1s)Open 

In a piece of brain tissue smaller than a dust mite, there are thousands of brain cell branches and connections. Researchers from Harvard University in Boston, MA have mapped them all in a new study appearing in Cell. They find some unexpected insights about how the cells talk to each other.

In a piece of brain tissue smaller than a dust mite, there are thousands of brain cell branches and connections. Researchers from Harvard University in Boston, MA have mapped them all in a new study appearing in Cell. They find some unexpected insights about how the cells talk to each other.___

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2015-07-12 19:11:58 (9 comments; 6 reshares; 26 +1s)Open 

Experiences of a woman who participated in a psychedelic drug (LSD) research recorded in 1960s.

Experiences of a woman who participated in a psychedelic drug (LSD) research recorded in 1960s.___

posted image

2015-07-11 15:52:20 (3 comments; 40 reshares; 77 +1s)Open 

Ocean life looks unreal in this time-lapsed and hyper-focused video

It's rare that you get a close-up peek at the hidden wonders of the world. Especially when it's a glance at the multi-colored, pulsating creatures that live deep in the ocean's trenches.
Sandro Bocci, an Italian film and documentary maker who specializes in experimenting with filming nature, shot a hypnotic underwater time-lapse of some strange-looking, alien-like aquatic animals in a marine aquarium in San Benedetto del Tronto, Italy.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/beautiful-time-lapse-video-of-creatures-of-the-ocean-2015-7#ixzz3fbB7F7BZ

Ocean life looks unreal in this time-lapsed and hyper-focused video

It's rare that you get a close-up peek at the hidden wonders of the world. Especially when it's a glance at the multi-colored, pulsating creatures that live deep in the ocean's trenches.
Sandro Bocci, an Italian film and documentary maker who specializes in experimenting with filming nature, shot a hypnotic underwater time-lapse of some strange-looking, alien-like aquatic animals in a marine aquarium in San Benedetto del Tronto, Italy.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/beautiful-time-lapse-video-of-creatures-of-the-ocean-2015-7#ixzz3fbB7F7BZ___

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2015-07-11 15:30:52 (6 comments; 10 reshares; 38 +1s)Open 

Driving Around New York City  in 1928 ...

Driving Around New York City  in 1928 ...___

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2015-07-11 14:57:45 (6 comments; 3 reshares; 35 +1s)Open 

Get ready for some incomprehensibly big numbers.

Scientists are predicting that genomics — the field of sequencing human DNA — will soon take the lead as the biggest data beast in the world, eventually creating more digital information than astronomy, particle physics and even popular Internet sites like YouTube.

The claim, published Tuesday in a PLOS Biology study, is a testament to the awesome complexity of the human genome, but it also illustrates a pressing challenge for the 15-year-old field. As genomics expands at an exponential rate, finding the digital space to store and manage all of the data is a major hurdle for the industry.

Get ready for some incomprehensibly big numbers.

Scientists are predicting that genomics — the field of sequencing human DNA — will soon take the lead as the biggest data beast in the world, eventually creating more digital information than astronomy, particle physics and even popular Internet sites like YouTube.

The claim, published Tuesday in a PLOS Biology study, is a testament to the awesome complexity of the human genome, but it also illustrates a pressing challenge for the 15-year-old field. As genomics expands at an exponential rate, finding the digital space to store and manage all of the data is a major hurdle for the industry.___

posted image

2015-07-11 14:55:49 (5 comments; 3 reshares; 25 +1s)Open 

Tribute to Omar Sherif who died yesterday.

Somewhere My Love (Lara's Theme)" from the movie Doctor Zhivago ~ Omar Sharif, Julie Christie. 1965

Tribute to Omar Sherif who died yesterday.

Somewhere My Love (Lara's Theme)" from the movie Doctor Zhivago ~ Omar Sharif, Julie Christie. 1965___

posted image

2015-07-11 14:52:44 (1 comments; 7 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

In 2001, Joshua Lederberg, a Nobel Prize-winning biologist, coined the term "microbiome," naming the trillions of microorganisms that reside in and on our bodies. Today, if you type that word into Google, you'll turn up thousands of hits linking gut bacteria to a laundry list of health problems, from food allergies to Ebola. Between 2007 and 2012, the number of journal articles published on the microbiome increased by nearly 250 percent. Our bodily inhabitants are quickly being cast as culprits or saviors for a diverse array of ailments.

The hype has kicked off a gold rush. Big food companies—including Nestle, PepsiCo, Monsanto, and General Mills—have funded gut bacteria studies, and some have even opened centers to develop foods that interact with the microbiome, such as probiotics. According to Transparency Market Research the global probiotics market is expected to reach anast... Mer »

In 2001, Joshua Lederberg, a Nobel Prize-winning biologist, coined the term "microbiome," naming the trillions of microorganisms that reside in and on our bodies. Today, if you type that word into Google, you'll turn up thousands of hits linking gut bacteria to a laundry list of health problems, from food allergies to Ebola. Between 2007 and 2012, the number of journal articles published on the microbiome increased by nearly 250 percent. Our bodily inhabitants are quickly being cast as culprits or saviors for a diverse array of ailments.

The hype has kicked off a gold rush. Big food companies—including Nestle, PepsiCo, Monsanto, and General Mills—have funded gut bacteria studies, and some have even opened centers to develop foods that interact with the microbiome, such as probiotics. According to Transparency Market Research the global probiotics market is expected to reach an astonishing $45 billion by 2018.

Still, despite the optimism, some researchers caution that much of what we hear about microbiome science isn't always, well, science. Dr. Lita Proctor heads the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Human Microbiome Project (HMP), an outgrowth of the Human Genome Project. "We are discovering a whole new ecosystem," she says. But "I do have some fear—we all do in the field—that the hype and the potential overpromise, and the idea that somehow this is going to be different—there is a terrific fear that it will all backfire."___

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2015-07-04 19:17:10 (2 comments; 19 reshares; 48 +1s)Open 

Scientists have created a revolutionary new electronic membrane that could replace pacemakers, fitting over a heart to keep it beating regularly over an indefinite period of time.

The device uses a “spider-web-like network of sensors and electrodes” to continuously monitor the heart’s electrical activity and could, in the future, deliver electrical shocks to maintain a healthy heart-rate.

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis used computer modelling technology and a 3D-printer to create a prototype membrane and fit it to a rabbit’s heart, keeping the organ operating perfectly “outside of the body in a nutrient and oxygen-rich solution”.

Scientists have created a revolutionary new electronic membrane that could replace pacemakers, fitting over a heart to keep it beating regularly over an indefinite period of time.

The device uses a “spider-web-like network of sensors and electrodes” to continuously monitor the heart’s electrical activity and could, in the future, deliver electrical shocks to maintain a healthy heart-rate.

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis used computer modelling technology and a 3D-printer to create a prototype membrane and fit it to a rabbit’s heart, keeping the organ operating perfectly “outside of the body in a nutrient and oxygen-rich solution”.___

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2015-07-04 17:50:52 (4 comments; 2 reshares; 37 +1s)Open 

Happy Independence Day!

Cherishing the freedoms we have in the U.S.A. !

#4thofjuly  

Happy Independence Day!

Cherishing the freedoms we have in the U.S.A. !

#4thofjuly  ___

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2015-07-03 20:40:33 (0 comments; 5 reshares; 19 +1s)Open 

Artificial Platelets Promote Clotting.

Researchers have developed platelet-like particles (PLPs) that seem to overcome previous limitations, being able to move toward sites where clotting is occurring and contracting the clots much like natural platelets do.

Artificial Platelets Promote Clotting.

Researchers have developed platelet-like particles (PLPs) that seem to overcome previous limitations, being able to move toward sites where clotting is occurring and contracting the clots much like natural platelets do.___

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2015-07-03 16:27:18 (7 comments; 12 reshares; 25 +1s)Open 

If you had the opportunity to feed harmless bugs into a coffee grinder, would you enjoy the experience? Even if the bugs had names, and you could hear their shells painfully crunching? And would you take a perverse pleasure from blasting an innocent bystander with an excruciating noise?

These are just some of the tests that Delroy Paulhus uses to understand the “dark personalities” around us. Essentially, he wants to answer a question we all may have asked: why do some people take pleasure in cruelty? Not just psychopaths and murderers – but school bullies, internet trolls and even apparently upstanding members of society such as politicians and policemen.

If you had the opportunity to feed harmless bugs into a coffee grinder, would you enjoy the experience? Even if the bugs had names, and you could hear their shells painfully crunching? And would you take a perverse pleasure from blasting an innocent bystander with an excruciating noise?

These are just some of the tests that Delroy Paulhus uses to understand the “dark personalities” around us. Essentially, he wants to answer a question we all may have asked: why do some people take pleasure in cruelty? Not just psychopaths and murderers – but school bullies, internet trolls and even apparently upstanding members of society such as politicians and policemen.___

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2015-06-25 00:30:42 (6 comments; 1 reshares; 374 +1s)Open 

#truedetective  

#truedetective  ___

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2015-06-18 01:29:57 (4 comments; 4 reshares; 23 +1s)Open 

This 3D medical animation shows an overview of the different types of human papilloma virus, the diseases they cause, how HPV infects skin tissue and how an HPV infection can be prevented by getting an HPV vaccination. The animation continues on to show how cervical cancer may be prevented by early diagnosis with a Pap test and the common treatments for common and gentle warts caused by HPV.

This 3D medical animation shows an overview of the different types of human papilloma virus, the diseases they cause, how HPV infects skin tissue and how an HPV infection can be prevented by getting an HPV vaccination. The animation continues on to show how cervical cancer may be prevented by early diagnosis with a Pap test and the common treatments for common and gentle warts caused by HPV.___

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2015-06-14 16:30:21 (7 comments; 14 reshares; 41 +1s)Open 

Violets, touch me nots, and squirting cucumbers all have one thing in common: They disperse their seeds by exploding. Here's some incredible footage of each one in action.

Violets, touch me nots, and squirting cucumbers all have one thing in common: They disperse their seeds by exploding. Here's some incredible footage of each one in action.___

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2015-06-11 23:59:37 (1 comments; 4 reshares; 38 +1s)Open 

James Harris Simons has been described as "the world's smartest billionaire", amassing a fortune through the clever use of mathematics and computers. He is now a renowned philanthropist.

James Harris Simons has been described as "the world's smartest billionaire", amassing a fortune through the clever use of mathematics and computers. He is now a renowned philanthropist.___

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2015-06-07 14:11:01 (0 comments; 8 reshares; 34 +1s)Open 

Useful resources. Stem Cell Basics.

Stem cells are defined by two characteristics:
► They can make copies of themselves, or self-renew
► They can differentiate, or divide into more specialized cells.

Beyond these two things, though, stem cells differ a great deal in their behaviors and capabilities. Cells within the first couple of cell divisions after fertilization are the only cells that are totipotent, meaning they can generate all of the 200 or so cell types in the human body, as well as temporary support structures like the placenta and umbilical cord.

Some cells are pluripotent, meaning they can generate all of the body’s cell types but cannot generate support structures like the placenta and umbilical cord. Other cells are multipotent, meaning they can generate a few different cell types, generally in aspecif... Mer »

Useful resources. Stem Cell Basics.

Stem cells are defined by two characteristics:
► They can make copies of themselves, or self-renew
► They can differentiate, or divide into more specialized cells.

Beyond these two things, though, stem cells differ a great deal in their behaviors and capabilities. Cells within the first couple of cell divisions after fertilization are the only cells that are totipotent, meaning they can generate all of the 200 or so cell types in the human body, as well as temporary support structures like the placenta and umbilical cord.

Some cells are pluripotent, meaning they can generate all of the body’s cell types but cannot generate support structures like the placenta and umbilical cord. Other cells are multipotent, meaning they can generate a few different cell types, generally in a specific tissue or organ.

As the body develops, the number and type of stem cells changes. Totipotent cells are no longer present after dividing into the cells that generate the placenta and umbilical cord. Pluripotent cells give rise to the specialized cells that make up the body’s organs and tissues. The stem cells that stay in your body throughout your life are tissue-specific, and there is evidence that these cells change as you age, too – your skin stem cells at age 20 won’t be exactly the same as your skin stem cells at age 80.

Useful resources:  Learn About Stem Cells, http://goo.gl/sFFjjm

Image description: Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC). MSCs are multipotent stromal (connective tissue) cells that can differentiate into a variety of cell types, including osteoblasts (bone cells), chondrocytes (cartilage cells), and adipocytes (fat cells). The youngest, most primitive MSCs can be obtained from the umbilical cord tissue.
(Larger view: http://goo.gl/V3nkpS)___

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2015-06-06 22:36:25 (0 comments; 5 reshares; 15 +1s)Open 

 MERS, which stands for Middle East respiratory syndrome, is a disease first detected in Saudi Arabia in late 2012. Most cases have been in the Middle East; some have been diagnosed elsewhere, including in the United States, in people who traveled there. The current outbreak in South Korea is the largest outside the Middle East.

 MERS, which stands for Middle East respiratory syndrome, is a disease first detected in Saudi Arabia in late 2012. Most cases have been in the Middle East; some have been diagnosed elsewhere, including in the United States, in people who traveled there. The current outbreak in South Korea is the largest outside the Middle East.___

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2015-05-31 15:59:14 (1 comments; 8 reshares; 35 +1s)Open 

In a leap for robotic development, the MIT researchers who built a robotic cheetah have now trained it to see and jump over hurdles as it runs — making this the first four-legged robot to run and jump over obstacles autonomously.

In a leap for robotic development, the MIT researchers who built a robotic cheetah have now trained it to see and jump over hurdles as it runs — making this the first four-legged robot to run and jump over obstacles autonomously.___

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2015-05-31 01:46:57 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 

An evolving "disease-in-a-dish" technology, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is bringing closer the day when such a seemingly futuristic personalized medicine scenario might not seem so far-fetched. Scientists have perfected mini cultured 3-D structures that grow and function much like the outer mantle -- the key working tissue, or cortex -- of the brain of the person from whom they were derived. Strikingly, these "organoids" buzz with neuronal network activity. Cells talk with each other in circuits, much as they do in our brains.

An evolving "disease-in-a-dish" technology, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is bringing closer the day when such a seemingly futuristic personalized medicine scenario might not seem so far-fetched. Scientists have perfected mini cultured 3-D structures that grow and function much like the outer mantle -- the key working tissue, or cortex -- of the brain of the person from whom they were derived. Strikingly, these "organoids" buzz with neuronal network activity. Cells talk with each other in circuits, much as they do in our brains.___

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2015-05-29 18:35:49 (1 comments; 4 reshares; 25 +1s)Open 

New research shows that "lost" memories lurk in the brain waiting to be found again -- in mice, anyway. In a study published Thursday in Science, researchers were able to reactivate memories they'd suppressed, indicating that retrograde amnesia -- where memories are lost after brain trauma -- may be more of a memory retrieval problem than an actual loss of data.

The researchers used something called optogenetics. If you're not familiar, it's super science fiction-y. Scientists can pick out specific neurons and introduce a special protein to them by way of an engineered virus. Once that protein is present in the brain cells, the cells are sensitive to blue light. That allows researchers to turn particular neurons on and off at will.

New research shows that "lost" memories lurk in the brain waiting to be found again -- in mice, anyway. In a study published Thursday in Science, researchers were able to reactivate memories they'd suppressed, indicating that retrograde amnesia -- where memories are lost after brain trauma -- may be more of a memory retrieval problem than an actual loss of data.

The researchers used something called optogenetics. If you're not familiar, it's super science fiction-y. Scientists can pick out specific neurons and introduce a special protein to them by way of an engineered virus. Once that protein is present in the brain cells, the cells are sensitive to blue light. That allows researchers to turn particular neurons on and off at will.___

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2015-05-25 18:09:48 (1 comments; 6 reshares; 39 +1s)Open 

Brian Bartlett lost his leg at 24. Rose Eveleth hears how a man who just wanted to ski again invented a new kind of knee.

Brian Bartlett lost his leg at 24. Rose Eveleth hears how a man who just wanted to ski again invented a new kind of knee.___

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2015-05-24 18:49:23 (7 comments; 5 reshares; 33 +1s)Open 

Sad news ... Famed mathematician #JohnNash  , whose accomplished life inspired the movie "A Beautiful Mind," was killed in a crash on the New Jersey Turnpike. The 86-year-old died along with his wife, 82-year-old Alicia Nash

Sad news ... Famed mathematician #JohnNash  , whose accomplished life inspired the movie "A Beautiful Mind," was killed in a crash on the New Jersey Turnpike. The 86-year-old died along with his wife, 82-year-old Alicia Nash___

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2015-05-22 01:03:00 (2 comments; 14 reshares; 60 +1s)Open 

Very important advance!
Professor Merlin Crossley and his team have shown that changing just a single letter of the DNA of human red blood cells in the laboratory increases their production of oxygen-carrying haemoglobin, a world-first advance that could lead to a cure for sickle cell anaemia and other blood disorders.
Read more:
http://newsroom.unsw.edu.au/news/science-tech/new-age-genome-editing-could-lead-cure-sickle-cell-anaemia

Research article:
Editing the genome to introduce a beneficial naturally occurring mutation associated with increased fetal globin
http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2015/150514/ncomms8085/full/ncomms8085.html

Image source:
Dreamstime.com

Very important advance!
Professor Merlin Crossley and his team have shown that changing just a single letter of the DNA of human red blood cells in the laboratory increases their production of oxygen-carrying haemoglobin, a world-first advance that could lead to a cure for sickle cell anaemia and other blood disorders.
Read more:
http://newsroom.unsw.edu.au/news/science-tech/new-age-genome-editing-could-lead-cure-sickle-cell-anaemia

Research article:
Editing the genome to introduce a beneficial naturally occurring mutation associated with increased fetal globin
http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2015/150514/ncomms8085/full/ncomms8085.html

Image source:
Dreamstime.com___

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