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Derya Unutmaz has been at 1 events

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Dawn Mission Education and Communications (E/C)1,883Update: Video here! http://www.youtube.com/user/NoisyAstronomer?v=SqIszii4H0c and here: https://plus.google.com/b/114633249213698877766/114633249213698877766/posts/Qq2jowbYN5h After an awesome year exploring asteroid Vesta, NASA’s Dawn Mission cruises on to Ceres 2015! Celebrate at a Dawn Mission Team Hangout!. Moderated by Dawn’s education and public outreach (E/PO) liaison, Dr. Britney Schmidt, and CosmoQuest, we'll talk about the results, the spacecraft, and our hopes for Ceres in 2015. You'll have a chance to ask questions and get involved. Stars of the show so far?  • Dr. Tom Prettyman, Science Team and GRaND lead, Planetary Science Institute • Drs. Tim Weise and Charles Gardner, NASA JPL Flight Operations Team • Drs. Lucille Le Corre and Vishnu Reddy, Framing Camera Team, Max Plank       Institute for Solar System Research • Dr. Debra Buczkowski, Participating Scientist, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory Submit your questions for the Dawn team by leaving them in the comments section below, on Dawn’s Facebook page, or by using the hashtag #HastaLaVesta on Twitter. Visit this event page on September 8, 2012 to watch the _Hangout On Air_, and to chime in on the conversation. Official website: http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/news/hasta_la_vesta.asp Twitter: https://twitter.com/nasa_dawn Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dawn.mission As the schedule and guest list is secured, we'll continue updating this page. Stay tuned for additional details.Dawn Mission Google+ Hangout with CosmoQuest2012-09-08 21:00:00110  

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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 15

posted image

2015-04-16 20:57:40 (15 comments, 6 reshares, 78 +1s)Open 

Finally the force awakens! Awesome new SW trailer!

Most reshares: 41

posted image

2015-07-11 15:52:20 (3 comments, 41 reshares, 69 +1s)Open 

Ocean life looks unreal in this time-lapsed and hyper-focused video

It's rare that you get a close-up peek at the hidden wonders of the world. Especially when it's a glance at the multi-colored, pulsating creatures that live deep in the ocean's trenches.
Sandro Bocci, an Italian film and documentary maker who specializes in experimenting with filming nature, shot a hypnotic underwater time-lapse of some strange-looking, alien-like aquatic animals in a marine aquarium in San Benedetto del Tronto, Italy.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/beautiful-time-lapse-video-of-creatures-of-the-ocean-2015-7#ixzz3fbB7F7BZ

Most plusones: 338

posted image

2015-06-25 00:30:42 (6 comments, 1 reshares, 338 +1s)Open 

#truedetective  

Senaste inlägg

posted image

2015-08-30 17:40:41 (4 comments, 2 reshares, 31 +1s)Open 

Very sad news that legendary neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks has passed away  :(  

He had recently joined NYU School of medicine where I had the chance to see him there last year. He will be missed and remembered through his remarkable books on the condition of human mind. 

#OliverSacks

Very sad news that legendary neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks has passed away  :(  

He had recently joined NYU School of medicine where I had the chance to see him there last year. He will be missed and remembered through his remarkable books on the condition of human mind. 

#OliverSacks___

posted image

2015-08-06 13:44:24 (2 comments, 6 reshares, 22 +1s)Open 

I am very proud of all my colleagues and working +The Jackson Laboratory  which is expanding its efforts for personalized medicine in many diseases and extending the healthy human lifespan, to make the world better place!

http://www.acceleratingdiscovery.com

"The Jackson Laboratory is leading the search for cures through the science of genetics, genomics and precision medicine. Learn more about how the Laboratory’s scientists are accelerating discovery in order to find more effective, precise and personalized ways to treat, prevent and cure diseases like cancer — and about how philanthropy makes our mission possible.

Gifts from friends are vital to sustaining The Jackson Laboratory's historic mission and keeping us at the forefront of scientific discovery. "

I am very proud of all my colleagues and working +The Jackson Laboratory  which is expanding its efforts for personalized medicine in many diseases and extending the healthy human lifespan, to make the world better place!

http://www.acceleratingdiscovery.com

"The Jackson Laboratory is leading the search for cures through the science of genetics, genomics and precision medicine. Learn more about how the Laboratory’s scientists are accelerating discovery in order to find more effective, precise and personalized ways to treat, prevent and cure diseases like cancer — and about how philanthropy makes our mission possible.

Gifts from friends are vital to sustaining The Jackson Laboratory's historic mission and keeping us at the forefront of scientific discovery. "___

posted image

2015-08-01 15:27:16 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

Another great educational video from Vsauce

Q: "What's an anagram of Banach-Tarski?" 
A: "Banach-Tarski Banach-Tarski."

Another great educational video from Vsauce

Q: "What's an anagram of Banach-Tarski?" 
A: "Banach-Tarski Banach-Tarski."___

posted image

2015-08-01 15:11:31 (0 comments, 26 reshares, 35 +1s)Open 

In a piece of brain tissue smaller than a dust mite, there are thousands of brain cell branches and connections. Researchers from Harvard University in Boston, MA have mapped them all in a new study appearing in Cell. They find some unexpected insights about how the cells talk to each other.

In a piece of brain tissue smaller than a dust mite, there are thousands of brain cell branches and connections. Researchers from Harvard University in Boston, MA have mapped them all in a new study appearing in Cell. They find some unexpected insights about how the cells talk to each other.___

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2015-07-12 19:11:58 (12 comments, 7 reshares, 23 +1s)Open 

Experiences of a woman who participated in a psychedelic drug (LSD) research recorded in 1960s.

Experiences of a woman who participated in a psychedelic drug (LSD) research recorded in 1960s.___

posted image

2015-07-11 15:52:20 (3 comments, 41 reshares, 69 +1s)Open 

Ocean life looks unreal in this time-lapsed and hyper-focused video

It's rare that you get a close-up peek at the hidden wonders of the world. Especially when it's a glance at the multi-colored, pulsating creatures that live deep in the ocean's trenches.
Sandro Bocci, an Italian film and documentary maker who specializes in experimenting with filming nature, shot a hypnotic underwater time-lapse of some strange-looking, alien-like aquatic animals in a marine aquarium in San Benedetto del Tronto, Italy.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/beautiful-time-lapse-video-of-creatures-of-the-ocean-2015-7#ixzz3fbB7F7BZ

Ocean life looks unreal in this time-lapsed and hyper-focused video

It's rare that you get a close-up peek at the hidden wonders of the world. Especially when it's a glance at the multi-colored, pulsating creatures that live deep in the ocean's trenches.
Sandro Bocci, an Italian film and documentary maker who specializes in experimenting with filming nature, shot a hypnotic underwater time-lapse of some strange-looking, alien-like aquatic animals in a marine aquarium in San Benedetto del Tronto, Italy.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/beautiful-time-lapse-video-of-creatures-of-the-ocean-2015-7#ixzz3fbB7F7BZ___

posted image

2015-07-11 15:30:52 (5 comments, 9 reshares, 37 +1s)Open 

Driving Around New York City  in 1928 ...

Driving Around New York City  in 1928 ...___

posted image

2015-07-11 14:57:45 (8 comments, 3 reshares, 34 +1s)Open 

Get ready for some incomprehensibly big numbers.

Scientists are predicting that genomics — the field of sequencing human DNA — will soon take the lead as the biggest data beast in the world, eventually creating more digital information than astronomy, particle physics and even popular Internet sites like YouTube.

The claim, published Tuesday in a PLOS Biology study, is a testament to the awesome complexity of the human genome, but it also illustrates a pressing challenge for the 15-year-old field. As genomics expands at an exponential rate, finding the digital space to store and manage all of the data is a major hurdle for the industry.

Get ready for some incomprehensibly big numbers.

Scientists are predicting that genomics — the field of sequencing human DNA — will soon take the lead as the biggest data beast in the world, eventually creating more digital information than astronomy, particle physics and even popular Internet sites like YouTube.

The claim, published Tuesday in a PLOS Biology study, is a testament to the awesome complexity of the human genome, but it also illustrates a pressing challenge for the 15-year-old field. As genomics expands at an exponential rate, finding the digital space to store and manage all of the data is a major hurdle for the industry.___

posted image

2015-07-11 14:55:49 (5 comments, 2 reshares, 18 +1s)Open 

Tribute to Omar Sherif who died yesterday.

Somewhere My Love (Lara's Theme)" from the movie Doctor Zhivago ~ Omar Sharif, Julie Christie. 1965

Tribute to Omar Sherif who died yesterday.

Somewhere My Love (Lara's Theme)" from the movie Doctor Zhivago ~ Omar Sharif, Julie Christie. 1965___

posted image

2015-07-11 14:52:44 (1 comments, 7 reshares, 20 +1s)Open 

In 2001, Joshua Lederberg, a Nobel Prize-winning biologist, coined the term "microbiome," naming the trillions of microorganisms that reside in and on our bodies. Today, if you type that word into Google, you'll turn up thousands of hits linking gut bacteria to a laundry list of health problems, from food allergies to Ebola. Between 2007 and 2012, the number of journal articles published on the microbiome increased by nearly 250 percent. Our bodily inhabitants are quickly being cast as culprits or saviors for a diverse array of ailments.

The hype has kicked off a gold rush. Big food companies—including Nestle, PepsiCo, Monsanto, and General Mills—have funded gut bacteria studies, and some have even opened centers to develop foods that interact with the microbiome, such as probiotics. According to Transparency Market Research the global probiotics market is expected to reach anast... Mer »

In 2001, Joshua Lederberg, a Nobel Prize-winning biologist, coined the term "microbiome," naming the trillions of microorganisms that reside in and on our bodies. Today, if you type that word into Google, you'll turn up thousands of hits linking gut bacteria to a laundry list of health problems, from food allergies to Ebola. Between 2007 and 2012, the number of journal articles published on the microbiome increased by nearly 250 percent. Our bodily inhabitants are quickly being cast as culprits or saviors for a diverse array of ailments.

The hype has kicked off a gold rush. Big food companies—including Nestle, PepsiCo, Monsanto, and General Mills—have funded gut bacteria studies, and some have even opened centers to develop foods that interact with the microbiome, such as probiotics. According to Transparency Market Research the global probiotics market is expected to reach an astonishing $45 billion by 2018.

Still, despite the optimism, some researchers caution that much of what we hear about microbiome science isn't always, well, science. Dr. Lita Proctor heads the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Human Microbiome Project (HMP), an outgrowth of the Human Genome Project. "We are discovering a whole new ecosystem," she says. But "I do have some fear—we all do in the field—that the hype and the potential overpromise, and the idea that somehow this is going to be different—there is a terrific fear that it will all backfire."___

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2015-07-04 19:17:10 (2 comments, 20 reshares, 47 +1s)Open 

Scientists have created a revolutionary new electronic membrane that could replace pacemakers, fitting over a heart to keep it beating regularly over an indefinite period of time.

The device uses a “spider-web-like network of sensors and electrodes” to continuously monitor the heart’s electrical activity and could, in the future, deliver electrical shocks to maintain a healthy heart-rate.

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis used computer modelling technology and a 3D-printer to create a prototype membrane and fit it to a rabbit’s heart, keeping the organ operating perfectly “outside of the body in a nutrient and oxygen-rich solution”.

Scientists have created a revolutionary new electronic membrane that could replace pacemakers, fitting over a heart to keep it beating regularly over an indefinite period of time.

The device uses a “spider-web-like network of sensors and electrodes” to continuously monitor the heart’s electrical activity and could, in the future, deliver electrical shocks to maintain a healthy heart-rate.

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis used computer modelling technology and a 3D-printer to create a prototype membrane and fit it to a rabbit’s heart, keeping the organ operating perfectly “outside of the body in a nutrient and oxygen-rich solution”.___

posted image

2015-07-04 17:50:52 (4 comments, 3 reshares, 37 +1s)Open 

Happy Independence Day!

Cherishing the freedoms we have in the U.S.A. !

#4thofjuly  

Happy Independence Day!

Cherishing the freedoms we have in the U.S.A. !

#4thofjuly  ___

posted image

2015-07-03 20:40:33 (0 comments, 5 reshares, 20 +1s)Open 

Artificial Platelets Promote Clotting.

Researchers have developed platelet-like particles (PLPs) that seem to overcome previous limitations, being able to move toward sites where clotting is occurring and contracting the clots much like natural platelets do.

Artificial Platelets Promote Clotting.

Researchers have developed platelet-like particles (PLPs) that seem to overcome previous limitations, being able to move toward sites where clotting is occurring and contracting the clots much like natural platelets do.___

posted image

2015-07-03 16:27:18 (7 comments, 11 reshares, 24 +1s)Open 

If you had the opportunity to feed harmless bugs into a coffee grinder, would you enjoy the experience? Even if the bugs had names, and you could hear their shells painfully crunching? And would you take a perverse pleasure from blasting an innocent bystander with an excruciating noise?

These are just some of the tests that Delroy Paulhus uses to understand the “dark personalities” around us. Essentially, he wants to answer a question we all may have asked: why do some people take pleasure in cruelty? Not just psychopaths and murderers – but school bullies, internet trolls and even apparently upstanding members of society such as politicians and policemen.

If you had the opportunity to feed harmless bugs into a coffee grinder, would you enjoy the experience? Even if the bugs had names, and you could hear their shells painfully crunching? And would you take a perverse pleasure from blasting an innocent bystander with an excruciating noise?

These are just some of the tests that Delroy Paulhus uses to understand the “dark personalities” around us. Essentially, he wants to answer a question we all may have asked: why do some people take pleasure in cruelty? Not just psychopaths and murderers – but school bullies, internet trolls and even apparently upstanding members of society such as politicians and policemen.___

posted image

2015-06-25 00:30:42 (6 comments, 1 reshares, 338 +1s)Open 

#truedetective  

#truedetective  ___

posted image

2015-06-18 01:29:57 (5 comments, 4 reshares, 21 +1s)Open 

This 3D medical animation shows an overview of the different types of human papilloma virus, the diseases they cause, how HPV infects skin tissue and how an HPV infection can be prevented by getting an HPV vaccination. The animation continues on to show how cervical cancer may be prevented by early diagnosis with a Pap test and the common treatments for common and gentle warts caused by HPV.

This 3D medical animation shows an overview of the different types of human papilloma virus, the diseases they cause, how HPV infects skin tissue and how an HPV infection can be prevented by getting an HPV vaccination. The animation continues on to show how cervical cancer may be prevented by early diagnosis with a Pap test and the common treatments for common and gentle warts caused by HPV.___

posted image

2015-06-14 16:30:21 (7 comments, 14 reshares, 40 +1s)Open 

Violets, touch me nots, and squirting cucumbers all have one thing in common: They disperse their seeds by exploding. Here's some incredible footage of each one in action.

Violets, touch me nots, and squirting cucumbers all have one thing in common: They disperse their seeds by exploding. Here's some incredible footage of each one in action.___

posted image

2015-06-11 23:59:37 (1 comments, 5 reshares, 38 +1s)Open 

James Harris Simons has been described as "the world's smartest billionaire", amassing a fortune through the clever use of mathematics and computers. He is now a renowned philanthropist.

James Harris Simons has been described as "the world's smartest billionaire", amassing a fortune through the clever use of mathematics and computers. He is now a renowned philanthropist.___

posted image

2015-06-07 14:11:01 (0 comments, 7 reshares, 32 +1s)Open 

Useful resources. Stem Cell Basics.

Stem cells are defined by two characteristics:
► They can make copies of themselves, or self-renew
► They can differentiate, or divide into more specialized cells.

Beyond these two things, though, stem cells differ a great deal in their behaviors and capabilities. Cells within the first couple of cell divisions after fertilization are the only cells that are totipotent, meaning they can generate all of the 200 or so cell types in the human body, as well as temporary support structures like the placenta and umbilical cord.

Some cells are pluripotent, meaning they can generate all of the body’s cell types but cannot generate support structures like the placenta and umbilical cord. Other cells are multipotent, meaning they can generate a few different cell types, generally in aspecif... Mer »

Useful resources. Stem Cell Basics.

Stem cells are defined by two characteristics:
► They can make copies of themselves, or self-renew
► They can differentiate, or divide into more specialized cells.

Beyond these two things, though, stem cells differ a great deal in their behaviors and capabilities. Cells within the first couple of cell divisions after fertilization are the only cells that are totipotent, meaning they can generate all of the 200 or so cell types in the human body, as well as temporary support structures like the placenta and umbilical cord.

Some cells are pluripotent, meaning they can generate all of the body’s cell types but cannot generate support structures like the placenta and umbilical cord. Other cells are multipotent, meaning they can generate a few different cell types, generally in a specific tissue or organ.

As the body develops, the number and type of stem cells changes. Totipotent cells are no longer present after dividing into the cells that generate the placenta and umbilical cord. Pluripotent cells give rise to the specialized cells that make up the body’s organs and tissues. The stem cells that stay in your body throughout your life are tissue-specific, and there is evidence that these cells change as you age, too – your skin stem cells at age 20 won’t be exactly the same as your skin stem cells at age 80.

Useful resources:  Learn About Stem Cells, http://goo.gl/sFFjjm

Image description: Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC). MSCs are multipotent stromal (connective tissue) cells that can differentiate into a variety of cell types, including osteoblasts (bone cells), chondrocytes (cartilage cells), and adipocytes (fat cells). The youngest, most primitive MSCs can be obtained from the umbilical cord tissue.
(Larger view: http://goo.gl/V3nkpS)___

posted image

2015-06-06 22:36:25 (0 comments, 5 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

 MERS, which stands for Middle East respiratory syndrome, is a disease first detected in Saudi Arabia in late 2012. Most cases have been in the Middle East; some have been diagnosed elsewhere, including in the United States, in people who traveled there. The current outbreak in South Korea is the largest outside the Middle East.

 MERS, which stands for Middle East respiratory syndrome, is a disease first detected in Saudi Arabia in late 2012. Most cases have been in the Middle East; some have been diagnosed elsewhere, including in the United States, in people who traveled there. The current outbreak in South Korea is the largest outside the Middle East.___

posted image

2015-05-31 15:59:14 (1 comments, 8 reshares, 35 +1s)Open 

In a leap for robotic development, the MIT researchers who built a robotic cheetah have now trained it to see and jump over hurdles as it runs — making this the first four-legged robot to run and jump over obstacles autonomously.

In a leap for robotic development, the MIT researchers who built a robotic cheetah have now trained it to see and jump over hurdles as it runs — making this the first four-legged robot to run and jump over obstacles autonomously.___

posted image

2015-05-31 01:46:57 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 18 +1s)Open 

An evolving "disease-in-a-dish" technology, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is bringing closer the day when such a seemingly futuristic personalized medicine scenario might not seem so far-fetched. Scientists have perfected mini cultured 3-D structures that grow and function much like the outer mantle -- the key working tissue, or cortex -- of the brain of the person from whom they were derived. Strikingly, these "organoids" buzz with neuronal network activity. Cells talk with each other in circuits, much as they do in our brains.

An evolving "disease-in-a-dish" technology, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is bringing closer the day when such a seemingly futuristic personalized medicine scenario might not seem so far-fetched. Scientists have perfected mini cultured 3-D structures that grow and function much like the outer mantle -- the key working tissue, or cortex -- of the brain of the person from whom they were derived. Strikingly, these "organoids" buzz with neuronal network activity. Cells talk with each other in circuits, much as they do in our brains.___

posted image

2015-05-29 18:35:49 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 26 +1s)Open 

New research shows that "lost" memories lurk in the brain waiting to be found again -- in mice, anyway. In a study published Thursday in Science, researchers were able to reactivate memories they'd suppressed, indicating that retrograde amnesia -- where memories are lost after brain trauma -- may be more of a memory retrieval problem than an actual loss of data.

The researchers used something called optogenetics. If you're not familiar, it's super science fiction-y. Scientists can pick out specific neurons and introduce a special protein to them by way of an engineered virus. Once that protein is present in the brain cells, the cells are sensitive to blue light. That allows researchers to turn particular neurons on and off at will.

New research shows that "lost" memories lurk in the brain waiting to be found again -- in mice, anyway. In a study published Thursday in Science, researchers were able to reactivate memories they'd suppressed, indicating that retrograde amnesia -- where memories are lost after brain trauma -- may be more of a memory retrieval problem than an actual loss of data.

The researchers used something called optogenetics. If you're not familiar, it's super science fiction-y. Scientists can pick out specific neurons and introduce a special protein to them by way of an engineered virus. Once that protein is present in the brain cells, the cells are sensitive to blue light. That allows researchers to turn particular neurons on and off at will.___

posted image

2015-05-25 18:09:48 (1 comments, 6 reshares, 39 +1s)Open 

Brian Bartlett lost his leg at 24. Rose Eveleth hears how a man who just wanted to ski again invented a new kind of knee.

Brian Bartlett lost his leg at 24. Rose Eveleth hears how a man who just wanted to ski again invented a new kind of knee.___

posted image

2015-05-24 19:00:24 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 38 +1s)Open 

Tribute to #JohnNash  who died today in a tragic accident.

Tribute to #JohnNash  who died today in a tragic accident.___

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2015-05-24 18:49:23 (7 comments, 5 reshares, 33 +1s)Open 

Sad news ... Famed mathematician #JohnNash  , whose accomplished life inspired the movie "A Beautiful Mind," was killed in a crash on the New Jersey Turnpike. The 86-year-old died along with his wife, 82-year-old Alicia Nash

Sad news ... Famed mathematician #JohnNash  , whose accomplished life inspired the movie "A Beautiful Mind," was killed in a crash on the New Jersey Turnpike. The 86-year-old died along with his wife, 82-year-old Alicia Nash___

posted image

2015-05-22 01:03:00 (3 comments, 14 reshares, 60 +1s)Open 

Very important advance!
Professor Merlin Crossley and his team have shown that changing just a single letter of the DNA of human red blood cells in the laboratory increases their production of oxygen-carrying haemoglobin, a world-first advance that could lead to a cure for sickle cell anaemia and other blood disorders.
Read more:
http://newsroom.unsw.edu.au/news/science-tech/new-age-genome-editing-could-lead-cure-sickle-cell-anaemia

Research article:
Editing the genome to introduce a beneficial naturally occurring mutation associated with increased fetal globin
http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2015/150514/ncomms8085/full/ncomms8085.html

Image source:
Dreamstime.com

Very important advance!
Professor Merlin Crossley and his team have shown that changing just a single letter of the DNA of human red blood cells in the laboratory increases their production of oxygen-carrying haemoglobin, a world-first advance that could lead to a cure for sickle cell anaemia and other blood disorders.
Read more:
http://newsroom.unsw.edu.au/news/science-tech/new-age-genome-editing-could-lead-cure-sickle-cell-anaemia

Research article:
Editing the genome to introduce a beneficial naturally occurring mutation associated with increased fetal globin
http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2015/150514/ncomms8085/full/ncomms8085.html

Image source:
Dreamstime.com___

posted image

2015-05-22 00:59:48 (2 comments, 12 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

It was even hard to breath watching this! What a profoundly harmonious performance!

It was even hard to breath watching this! What a profoundly harmonious performance!___

posted image

2015-05-20 14:04:37 (7 comments, 3 reshares, 28 +1s)Open 

Truly appalling!

"The pitch was simple, and played on the images of a devastating disease to tug on heartstrings and open pocketbooks.

One of the websites featured pictures of smiling children, some of them in hospital beds, one in a tutu and a scarf covering her bare head.

The money, people were told, would go directly to helping women and children sick with cancer, paying for wigs, pain medications, and transportation to chemotherapy appointments.

All of those claims were “outright lies,” according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday by the Federal Trade Commission, all 50 states and the District of Columbia."

Truly appalling!

"The pitch was simple, and played on the images of a devastating disease to tug on heartstrings and open pocketbooks.

One of the websites featured pictures of smiling children, some of them in hospital beds, one in a tutu and a scarf covering her bare head.

The money, people were told, would go directly to helping women and children sick with cancer, paying for wigs, pain medications, and transportation to chemotherapy appointments.

All of those claims were “outright lies,” according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday by the Federal Trade Commission, all 50 states and the District of Columbia."___

posted image

2015-05-18 01:39:48 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Blues Brothers 2000 - Ghost rider in the sky 

Blues Brothers 2000 - Ghost rider in the sky ___

posted image

2015-05-18 01:21:13 (6 comments, 10 reshares, 48 +1s)Open 

The Dunning–Kruger effect.

The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias wherein unskilled individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly assessing their ability to be much higher than is accurate. Conversely, highly skilled individuals tend to underestimate their relative competence, erroneously assuming that tasks which are easy for them are also easy for others. The miscalibration of the incompetent stems from an error about the self, whereas the miscalibration of the highly competent stems from an error about others.

The phenomenon was first tested in a series of experiments published in 1999 by David Dunning and Justin Kruger of Cornell University. They  proposed that, for a given skill, incompetent people will:

- fail to recognize their own lack of skill
- fail to recognize genuine skill in others
- fail torecog... Mer »

The Dunning–Kruger effect.

The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias wherein unskilled individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly assessing their ability to be much higher than is accurate. Conversely, highly skilled individuals tend to underestimate their relative competence, erroneously assuming that tasks which are easy for them are also easy for others. The miscalibration of the incompetent stems from an error about the self, whereas the miscalibration of the highly competent stems from an error about others.

The phenomenon was first tested in a series of experiments published in 1999 by David Dunning and Justin Kruger of Cornell University. They  proposed that, for a given skill, incompetent people will:

- fail to recognize their own lack of skill
- fail to recognize genuine skill in others
- fail to recognize the extremity of their inadequacy
- recognize and acknowledge their own previous lack of skill, if they are exposed to training for that skill.

Dunning and Kruger were awarded the 2000 satirical Ig Nobel Prize in Psychology.

Read more: http://goo.gl/INBWwg
The Basic Laws of Human Stupidity: http://goo.gl/DMXkKC___

posted image

2015-05-12 20:57:47 (2 comments, 6 reshares, 33 +1s)Open 

The road to 150.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/nation/road-to-150/FutureHuman-print.pdf

The road to 150.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/nation/road-to-150/FutureHuman-print.pdf___

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2015-05-10 17:52:36 (5 comments, 25 reshares, 66 +1s)Open 

Today’s digital photos are far more vivid than just a few years ago, thanks to a steady stream of advances in optics, detectors, and software. Similar advances have also improved the ability of machines called cryo-electron microscopes (cryo-EMs) to see the Lilliputian world of atoms and molecules. Now, researchers report that they’ve created the highest ever resolution cryo-EM image, revealing a druglike molecule bound to its protein target at near atomic resolution. The resolution is so sharp that it rivals images produced by x-ray crystallography, long the gold standard for mapping the atomic contours of proteins. This newfound success is likely to dramatically help drugmakers design novel medicines for a wide variety of conditions

Today’s digital photos are far more vivid than just a few years ago, thanks to a steady stream of advances in optics, detectors, and software. Similar advances have also improved the ability of machines called cryo-electron microscopes (cryo-EMs) to see the Lilliputian world of atoms and molecules. Now, researchers report that they’ve created the highest ever resolution cryo-EM image, revealing a druglike molecule bound to its protein target at near atomic resolution. The resolution is so sharp that it rivals images produced by x-ray crystallography, long the gold standard for mapping the atomic contours of proteins. This newfound success is likely to dramatically help drugmakers design novel medicines for a wide variety of conditions___

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2015-05-08 18:50:53 (0 comments, 10 reshares, 32 +1s)Open 

Unraveling the Influence of Gut Microbes on the Mind.

Within the last decade, the phrase “gut feelings” has taken on a whole new meaning. Traditionally, scientists have focused on the role of the central nervous system in regulating our moods and behaviors, but a paradigm shift is afoot, with new research revealing a unique role of our gut microbiota in influencing emotion.

JAMA, http://goo.gl/Tvtb2v

Unraveling the Influence of Gut Microbes on the Mind.

Within the last decade, the phrase “gut feelings” has taken on a whole new meaning. Traditionally, scientists have focused on the role of the central nervous system in regulating our moods and behaviors, but a paradigm shift is afoot, with new research revealing a unique role of our gut microbiota in influencing emotion.

JAMA, http://goo.gl/Tvtb2v___

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2015-05-08 18:47:21 (1 comments, 9 reshares, 25 +1s)Open 

When Dr. Ian Crozier was released from Emory University Hospital in October after a long, brutal fight with Ebola that nearly ended his life, his medical team thought he was cured. But less than two months later, he was back at the hospital with fading sight, intense pain and soaring pressure in his left eye.

Test results were chilling: The inside of Dr. Crozier’s eye was teeming with Ebola.

His doctors were amazed. They had considered the possibility that the virus had invaded his eye, but they had not really expected to find it. 

When Dr. Ian Crozier was released from Emory University Hospital in October after a long, brutal fight with Ebola that nearly ended his life, his medical team thought he was cured. But less than two months later, he was back at the hospital with fading sight, intense pain and soaring pressure in his left eye.

Test results were chilling: The inside of Dr. Crozier’s eye was teeming with Ebola.

His doctors were amazed. They had considered the possibility that the virus had invaded his eye, but they had not really expected to find it. ___

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2015-04-29 22:41:52 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 22 +1s)Open 

NO one who lived through the 1990s would have suspected that one day people would look back on the period as a golden age of bipartisan cooperation. But in some important ways, it was. Amid the policy fights that followed the Republican victories of 1994, President Bill Clinton and the new majorities in Congress reached one particularly good deal: doubling the budget for the National Institutes of Health.

The decision was bipartisan, because health is both a moral and financial issue. Government spends more on health care than any other area. Taxpayers spend more than $1 trillion a year for Medicare and Medicaid alone, and even more when you add in programs like Veterans Affairs, the Children’s Health Insurance Program and the Indian Health Service.

Unfortunately, since the end of the five-year effort that roughly doubled the N.I.H. budget by 2003, funding for the institutes has beenf... Mer »

NO one who lived through the 1990s would have suspected that one day people would look back on the period as a golden age of bipartisan cooperation. But in some important ways, it was. Amid the policy fights that followed the Republican victories of 1994, President Bill Clinton and the new majorities in Congress reached one particularly good deal: doubling the budget for the National Institutes of Health.

The decision was bipartisan, because health is both a moral and financial issue. Government spends more on health care than any other area. Taxpayers spend more than $1 trillion a year for Medicare and Medicaid alone, and even more when you add in programs like Veterans Affairs, the Children’s Health Insurance Program and the Indian Health Service.

Unfortunately, since the end of the five-year effort that roughly doubled the N.I.H. budget by 2003, funding for the institutes has been flat. The N.I.H. budget (about $30 billion last year) has effectively been reduced by more than 20 percent since then. As 92 percent of the N.I.H. budget goes directly to research, one result is that the institutes awarded 12.5 percent fewer grants last year than in 2003. Grant applications, over the same period, increased by almost 50 percent.___

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2015-04-26 15:06:12 (7 comments, 15 reshares, 99 +1s)Open 

An extraordinary man with a severe disability creates incredible works of art using a typewriter. Incredible and inspirational!

An extraordinary man with a severe disability creates incredible works of art using a typewriter. Incredible and inspirational!___

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2015-04-24 00:21:28 (3 comments, 3 reshares, 28 +1s)Open 

A new research study has shown that pancreatic cancer cells can be coaxed to revert back toward normal cells by introducing a protein called E47. E47 binds to specific DNA sequences and controls genes involved in growth and differentiation.


A new research study has shown that pancreatic cancer cells can be coaxed to revert back toward normal cells by introducing a protein called E47. E47 binds to specific DNA sequences and controls genes involved in growth and differentiation.
___

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2015-04-23 23:19:05 (8 comments, 5 reshares, 25 +1s)Open 

___

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2015-04-23 14:52:20 (1 comments, 4 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

Another great article from +Gary Marcus 

"Chappie is thus every roboticist’s dream—a combination of hardware and software that can learn pretty much anything. In a single week, Chappie grows from infant to toddler to surly teen-ager. It masters everything from the English language to the fine art of throwing knives at moving targets. The film never tells us how Chappie learns so fast, but pretty much every software engineer and developmental psychologist I know would love a machine that could match Chappie’s skills. Ultimately, though, the movie is about something different: not the cognitive scientist’s question about how intelligent creatures manage to learn about the world but the educator’s question about how human beings can raise moral robots. Chappie doesn’t just learn a set of facts; Chappie learns a set of values.Johannesburg. There’s an evil company man, droids thatmenace the pop... Mer »

Another great article from +Gary Marcus 

"Chappie is thus every roboticist’s dream—a combination of hardware and software that can learn pretty much anything. In a single week, Chappie grows from infant to toddler to surly teen-ager. It masters everything from the English language to the fine art of throwing knives at moving targets. The film never tells us how Chappie learns so fast, but pretty much every software engineer and developmental psychologist I know would love a machine that could match Chappie’s skills. Ultimately, though, the movie is about something different: not the cognitive scientist’s question about how intelligent creatures manage to learn about the world but the educator’s question about how human beings can raise moral robots. Chappie doesn’t just learn a set of facts; Chappie learns a set of values.Johannesburg. There’s an evil company man, droids that menace the population, and a whole lot of blood, shooting, and broken glass. About the only thing that seems new is the intermittently adorable android protagonist, Chappie...."___

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2015-04-23 01:44:08 (3 comments, 10 reshares, 30 +1s)Open 

This 3D medical animation explains the differences between “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and “good” high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and their effects on the body.

This 3D medical animation explains the differences between “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and “good” high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and their effects on the body.___

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2015-04-21 22:53:56 (0 comments, 6 reshares, 31 +1s)Open 

Russian Artist Creates Steampunk Animals From Old Car Parts, Watches And Electronics

When working with metal, it takes a true master to breathe life into their artwork. Russian artist Igor Verniy does just that with his beautiful and elegant articulated steampunk animal sculptures. Their moving parts and Verniy’s attention to detail makes them come alive.

A lot of work goes on behind the scenes before Verniy creates his artwork. He observes his creations’ living counterparts to ensure that he captures their movements just right. Then, he assembles them from various pieces of scrap metal – old car parts, bike parts, clock movements, tableware, and anything else that fits.

More of these cool creations here: http://www.boredpanda.com/steampunk-animal-sculptures-igor-verniy/

Russian Artist Creates Steampunk Animals From Old Car Parts, Watches And Electronics

When working with metal, it takes a true master to breathe life into their artwork. Russian artist Igor Verniy does just that with his beautiful and elegant articulated steampunk animal sculptures. Their moving parts and Verniy’s attention to detail makes them come alive.

A lot of work goes on behind the scenes before Verniy creates his artwork. He observes his creations’ living counterparts to ensure that he captures their movements just right. Then, he assembles them from various pieces of scrap metal – old car parts, bike parts, clock movements, tableware, and anything else that fits.

More of these cool creations here: http://www.boredpanda.com/steampunk-animal-sculptures-igor-verniy/___

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2015-04-21 22:16:42 (1 comments, 7 reshares, 27 +1s)Open 

Marvelous performance and magical music!

Marvelous performance and magical music!___

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2015-04-21 02:03:15 (2 comments, 4 reshares, 35 +1s)Open 

What is life?

Life is the object of biology, yet its definition is somewhat elusive. In the book "Biogenesis", more than 48 different authorities each suggest a different definition; the lack of agreement reflects the complexity of answering this seemingly, intuitively, simple question (1) . 

Life is often defined in basic biology textbooks in terms of a list of distinctive properties that distinguish living systems from non-living. These lists are often different, depending upon the interests of the authors. Each attempt at a definition are inextricably linked to a theory from which it derives its meaning.

Living entities metabolize, grow, die, reproduce, respond, move, have complex organized functional structures, heritable variability, and have lineages which can evolve over generational time, producing new and emergent... Mer »

What is life?

Life is the object of biology, yet its definition is somewhat elusive. In the book "Biogenesis", more than 48 different authorities each suggest a different definition; the lack of agreement reflects the complexity of answering this seemingly, intuitively, simple question (1) . 

Life is often defined in basic biology textbooks in terms of a list of distinctive properties that distinguish living systems from non-living. These lists are often different, depending upon the interests of the authors. Each attempt at a definition are inextricably linked to a theory from which it derives its meaning.

Living entities metabolize, grow, die, reproduce, respond, move, have complex organized functional structures, heritable variability, and have lineages which can evolve over generational time, producing new and emergent functional structures that provide increased adaptive fitness in changing environments.

Something that is alive has organized, complex structures that carry out these functions as well as sensing and responding to interior states and to the external environment and engaging in movement within that environment.

Evolutionary phenomena are an inextricable aspect of living systems; any attempt to define life in the absence of this perspective will be futile. (http://goo.gl/r46nDd)

Life may be considered a characteristic of something that exhibits all or most of the following traits:

Homeostasis: Regulation of the internal environment to maintain a constant state; for example, electrolyte concentration or sweating to reduce temperature
Organization: Being structurally composed of one or more cells — the basic units of life
Metabolism: Transformation of energy by converting chemicals and energy into cellular components (anabolism) and decomposing organic matter (catabolism). Living things require energy to maintain internal organization (homeostasis) and to produce the other phenomena associated with life
Growth: Maintenance of a higher rate of anabolism than catabolism. A growing organism increases in size in all of its parts, rather than simply accumulating matter
Adaptation: The ability to change over time in response to the environment. This ability is fundamental to the process of evolution and is determined by the organism's heredity, diet, and external factors
Response to stimuli: A response can take many forms, from the contraction of a unicellular organism to external chemicals, to complex reactions involving all the senses of multicellular organisms. A response is often expressed by motion; for example, the leaves of a plant turning toward the sun (phototropism), and chemotaxis
Reproduction: The ability to produce new individual organisms, either asexually from a single parent organism, or sexually from two parent organisms.

These complex processes called physiological functions, have underlying physical and chemical bases, as well as signaling and control mechanisms that are essential to maintaining life.

Viruses are most often considered replicators rather than forms of life. They have been described as "organisms at the edge of life", since they possess genes, evolve by natural selection, and replicate by creating multiple copies of themselves through self-assembly. However, viruses do not metabolize and they require a host cell to make new products. (http://goo.gl/eBYded)

Cell Theory
1. All living organisms are composed of one or more cells
2. The cell is the most basic unit of life
3. All cells arise from pre-existing, living cells. (http://goo.gl/qQYmE0)

(1) http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/File/pdfs/american_biology_teacher/2013/ABT_Online_Jan_2013.pdf
Image: http://goo.gl/jFUVds, Birth of a yeast cell. Yeast can reproduce sexually. A mother and father cell fuse and create one large cell that contains four offspring. When environmental conditions are favorable, the offspring are released, as shown here.___

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2015-04-19 14:39:40 (6 comments, 7 reshares, 110 +1s)Open 

Man made cell ... through  knitting :) 

Source: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/165014773822548612/

Man made cell ... through  knitting :) 

Source: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/165014773822548612/___

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2015-04-19 00:42:11 (11 comments, 6 reshares, 131 +1s)Open 

Another excellent educational video from Vsauce.

Another excellent educational video from Vsauce.___

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2015-04-18 22:15:06 (1 comments, 4 reshares, 31 +1s)Open 

Festive Fat Cells

Fat is made up of spherical plump cells supplied by a network of blood vessels.

These may look like holly berries, but they are in fact white fat cells colored red. Fat cells are some of the largest cells in the body and can grow to be about the same diameter as a human hair (i.e., 100 micrometers). Fat cells are essential—as they store and release energy, protect major organs, and provide insulation from the cold. But it turns out that they also produce hormones and other substances that affect our health—and this is particularly true of fat cells around the midsection. Having excess belly fat can disrupt the normal balance of hormones and increase the risks of heart disease, diabetes, and even certain types of cancer.

Source: http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/festive-fat-cells

Festive Fat Cells

Fat is made up of spherical plump cells supplied by a network of blood vessels.

These may look like holly berries, but they are in fact white fat cells colored red. Fat cells are some of the largest cells in the body and can grow to be about the same diameter as a human hair (i.e., 100 micrometers). Fat cells are essential—as they store and release energy, protect major organs, and provide insulation from the cold. But it turns out that they also produce hormones and other substances that affect our health—and this is particularly true of fat cells around the midsection. Having excess belly fat can disrupt the normal balance of hormones and increase the risks of heart disease, diabetes, and even certain types of cancer.

Source: http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/festive-fat-cells___

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2015-04-18 21:53:24 (1 comments, 7 reshares, 28 +1s)Open 

They call them “organoids,” and they’re 3D printed, beating cardiac cells which are sure to inspire scientists and biologists while raising ethical concerns among critics intent on stopping the progress of the technology.

The groundbreaking research program aimed at creating human organs is the result of a project at the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and it features heart cells which are made functional and shaped using a highly-specialized 3D printer.

They call them “organoids,” and they’re 3D printed, beating cardiac cells which are sure to inspire scientists and biologists while raising ethical concerns among critics intent on stopping the progress of the technology.

The groundbreaking research program aimed at creating human organs is the result of a project at the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and it features heart cells which are made functional and shaped using a highly-specialized 3D printer.___

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2015-04-16 20:57:40 (15 comments, 6 reshares, 78 +1s)Open 

Finally the force awakens! Awesome new SW trailer!

Finally the force awakens! Awesome new SW trailer!___

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2015-04-13 23:27:40 (2 comments, 17 reshares, 40 +1s)Open 

Nanotechnology might soon save you a trip to the dentist. Researchers have developed tiny sphere-shaped particles that ferry a payload of bacteria-slaying drugs to the surface of the teeth, where they fight plaque and tooth decay on the spot. The approach could also be adapted to combat other plaquelike substances, known as biofilms, such as those that form on medical devices like orthopedic implants.

Nanotechnology might soon save you a trip to the dentist. Researchers have developed tiny sphere-shaped particles that ferry a payload of bacteria-slaying drugs to the surface of the teeth, where they fight plaque and tooth decay on the spot. The approach could also be adapted to combat other plaquelike substances, known as biofilms, such as those that form on medical devices like orthopedic implants.___

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